Training

Lucozade Sport’s Nutrition and Hydration Q&A

When preparing for a marathon, what you put into your body alongside your training is very important. Benjamin Garcia, Lucozade Sport’s Sports Science Manager answers some of the most common questions that marathon runners have on the subject.

How much fluid should I consume to help maintain my performance during my run?
How much fluid you need will differ from person to person; have a look at the Lucozade Sport fluid loss calculator. The basic rule is drink little and often and avoid taking on too much liquid in one go.

How much should I drink after a training session?
Again, your personal needs will differ from person to person; have a look at the Lucozade Sport fluid loss calculator. Aim to drink one and a half times the amount you lost when training. And be sure to rehydrate with a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink in the hours after your session.

How much should I be drinking during the day/before training?
You should always be looking to drink about two litres a day. But if you’re training hard then you will need to take on more to account for this.

Set yourself up for a successful marathon run with this guide on how to stay hydrated.

When should I take on fuel during a training run?
Training hard can deplete your limited carbohydrate store.  If you’re training for more than 60-90 minutes then you should take on 30g-60g of carbohydrate per hour to save the stores in your body. Everyone’s need is different so practice this during your training.

Set yourself up for a successful marathon run with this guide on how to stay fuelled.

Do I need to take on carbohydrate during a short training session?
If your training session is less than 60 minutes and you’ve eaten well in the hours before the session you may not need to consume any fuel during. You may want to take a bottle of Lucozade Sport with you in case you need to top up with fuel. It will provide a useful source of fluid and electrolytes as well.

Is it OK to train first thing in the morning before having breakfast?
Sure, but we would advise you not to go too hard before breakfast as you won’t have eaten since the evening and therefore it may feel tougher.

What are good examples of a Race Day breakfast?
Any food high in carbohydrate is perfect as a pre-race meal but stick to a food you’re used to and have eaten in training. Porridge, toast, cereal, bagels and fruit juice are all excellent choices.

What should I eat the evening before a race?
A carbohydrate-rich meal and snacks before Race Day will make sure you have the right fuel to perform to your best. But do stick to foods you’re used to and have eaten in training before.

Is there anything I should avoid eating just before a race?
Aim to keep fibre and fat to a minimum in your evening meal and pre-race breakfast to avoid any unnecessary trips to the bathroom!

What should I drink post-race to help my body recover?
Make sure you drink a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink in the hours after exercising to rehydrate.

What are good things to eat after a race to help my body recover?
Carbohydrates will begin the recovery of your fuel stores in the body while protein will help support muscle strength. Meat, fish or dairy is advised as a good source of high-quality protein.

What other tips are there to help recover from a race?
Keep moving! Even some small movements after the race will help and be sure to continue to take on fluids, carbohydrates and proteins. And finally get plenty of sleep – you’ve earned it.